San Diego Downtown

San Diego Downtown

The heart of every city lives in its downtown, and San Diego is no exception. Located only minutes from the airport, San Diego’s thriving downtown districts offer a plethora of options for accommodations, activities, dining and cultural attractions, all accessible by foot or by trolley. Modern and historic buildings stand side-by-side, in the downtown historic Gaslamp District, housing shops and boutiques, trendy nightclubs, rooftop bars and fine dining restaurants.

 

If you’re looking for some local flavor, immerse yourself in San Diego’s Little Italy district, just north of the downtown

On the west edge of San Diego downtown lies 3 miles of the Embarcadero district. Meaning “the landing place” in Spanish, the Embarcadero boardwalk hugs the east side of San Diego Bay, and is home to the San Diego cruise terminal, the Navy Pier and Seaport Village. Climb aboard to explore the ships at the USS Midway Museum, the Star of India, or the Maritime Museum of San Diego. If a moving sea vessel is more your flavor, hop on a harbor cruise and explore the San Diego Bay. For fun on land, visit Seaport Village to grab a bite or pick up a one-of-a-kind gift.  You can enjoy various cultural attractions

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San Diego Airport

San Diego Airport

In 1927 San Diego played a leading role in one of history’s most significant and dramatic aviation achievements. In that year, the young aviator Charles A. Lindbergh came to town and commissioned Ryan Airlines to build a special aircraft that could complete the first nonstop New York to Paris flight.

The 8,750-foot “mega-runway” built to accommodate World War II-era long-range bombers made San Diego International Airport “jet-ready” long before United Airlines became the first airline to offer pure jet service in September 1960. American Airlines followed with their “Jet Ace” scheduled service to Dallas/Fort Worth a few weeks later. San Diego had entered the Jet Age. Today San Diego International is the busiest single-runway commercial airport in the United States. It is also the second-busiest single-use runway in the world after Gatwick Airport with about 465 scheduled operations carrying 48,000 passengers each day; a total of 18,756,997 passengers in 2014 and home to the first ever LEED-Platinum Certified airport terminal.

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LAX

Los Angeles International Airport

Airport hub known for the colorful glass pylons & 32-foot-high “LAX” letters outside its entrance.

When the state of California was still a Mexican province, the land which is now occupied by Los Angeles International Airport was part of a large Mexican land grant known as the Rancho Sausal Redondo. This rancho, which took its name from a clump of willows, stretched along the coast from what is now Playa del Rey to Redondo Beach and extended inland to Inglewood. It was granted to Antonio Ygnacio Avila by Juan Alvarado, then governor of Alta California, in 1837.

During  the 1920s the Bennett Rancho began to attract pioneer aviators who used a small portion of this property as a makeshift landing strip. The airplanes of that era landed and departed on roughground but soon attracted people on weekends who came “out to the country” to see the early flying machines in action. In 1927 a group of local citizens led by Inglewood Municipal Judge Frank D. Parent; Harry Culver, a real estate promoter; and George Cleaver, an oil land developer, began to push for the establishment of a major airport on this section of the Bennett Rancho.That same year the Los Angeles City Council became interested in the creation of a municipal airport. In July 1927 real estate agent William W. Mines, representing the Martin interests, offered 640 acres of the former Bennett Rancho to use as an airport for the City of Los Angeles. Thus the site became known as Mines Field. On July 25, 1928, the City Council chose Mines Field as the location for the City’s airport, and when the lease was executed in October 1928, the forerunner of Los Angeles International Airport was born.

“LA” served as the designation for Los Angeles Airport. But with the rapid growth in the aviation industry the designations expanded to three letters c. 1947, and “LA” became “LAX.” The letter “X” has no specific meaning in this identifier.

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Old Town

It’s a great place to see what San Diego looked like when it was first settled. The Hispanic influence is, obviously, very strong. Being from another country, it was interesting to view the architecture and hear a little of the story of San Diego’s beginnings.
There’s lots of tourist type outlets, selling everything and anything. In some ways, that detracts from the historical significance of the park

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Balboa Park

Balboa Park is a 1,200-acre urban cultural park in San Diego Ca. In addition to open space areas, natural vegetation zones, green belts, gardens, and walking paths, it contains museums, several theaters, and the world-famous San Diego Zoo. There are also many recreational facilities and several gift shops and restaurants within the boundaries of the park. Placed in reserve in 1835, the park’s site is one of the oldest in the United States dedicated to public recreational use. It’s a phenomenal place to visit. No matter what your interests, you are sure to find something to interest you here. Set in beautiful park lands. Museums, restaurants, sites, incredible architecture, the zoo and great food.

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San Diego Zoo

This zoo is humongous with an amazing animal variety; but even more fascinating is the incredible variety of plants! Their conservation efforts are outstanding and they continue to improve …. renovations and expansions are underway at this time. The workers and keepers are friendly and very proud of what the Zoo has accomplished. The zoo has a great diversity of wildlife from around the world and some exhibits that focus on Southern California as well. You can spend a whole day here as there is so much to see and do.

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